Genealogy Research

Genealogy is an amazing community!

I connected with a cousin in the Netherlands about 3 years ago, via genealogieonline.com, Johanna.  She is the 2nd great-granddaughter of my 3rd great-grandfather, Walter, which makes us 4th cousins, 1x removed.  She sent me three photographs that I am so excited to have, mostly because one of them in particular is a photo of Christiane Nullmeyer, who is my 3rd great-grandmother.  She died young, probably during childbirth.  For years, I had no knowledge of her, thinking that my 3rd great-grandfather’s 3rd wife, Kate Dulk, was my actual ancestor.  I know very little information about her, so having actual photographic proof of her is AMAZING!

I am so grateful for being able to find cousins online, who have been willing to share information.  And now for the photographs!

The Noteboom Family, right to left: Johanna (Honey), Walter, Dorothea, Anna, Geraldine (between her parents), Christiane, Walter Jr. From the collection of cousin Johanna, used with her permission

The Noteboom Family, right to left:
Johanna (Honey), Walter, Dorothea, Anna, Geraldine (between her parents), Christiane, Walter Jr.
From the collection of cousin Johanna, used with her permission

The date of this photo is unknown, but based on the apparent ages of the children, I would place this photo c. 1895.  Give or take a year or so, I would say Anna was 13, Dorothea – 12, Walter – 11, Johanna – 10, Geraldine – 6.

The Noteboom Family, right to left: Kate, Johanna, Dorothea, Geraldine, Walter Jr., and Walter. c. 1905 From the collection of cousin Johanna, used with her permission

The Noteboom Family, right to left:
Kate, Johanna, Dorothea, Geraldine, Walter Jr., and Walter.
c. 1905
From the collection of cousin Johanna, used with her permission

The date of this photo is c. 1905.  Anna is not present in this photo, which is not surprising.  She was estranged from her family from 1901 to 1906 because of her marriage to Francis Theodore.  She reconciled with them after his disappearance.

From left to right: Kate, Walter, his niece Gessina, his sister Anna. From the collection of cousin Johanna, used with her permission

From left to right:
Kate, Walter, his niece Gessina, his sister Anna.
From the collection of cousin Johanna, used with her permission

I also don’t know the date of this photo, but since Walter and Kate are pictured with his family who still lived in the Netherlands, I suspect this is from 1913.  I have a passenger list from a trip they took to Europe in the fall of 1913, shortly before he died.  Gessina is the daughter of his sister Elizabeth, who had passed away in 1878.

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Isaiah Golden – Death Index and Obituary

Isaiah Golden - ObituaryIsaiah Golden died on July 21, 1911 at his home at 79 Somers Street in Brooklyn, at the age of 87.  In his obituary, his cause of death was noted as “complication of diseases”.  At the time of his death, he was retired, and had been a resident of the Eastern District of Brooklyn for 60 years.  His obituary confirmed his birth in West Farms, Westchester County, on March 4, 1824.  It details his long-time membership in the Old Bushwick Dutch Reformed Church on Humboldt Street in Brooklyn. At the time of his death, his wife Susanna, three daughters and three sons were still living (Harriet “Hattie” Travis, Emma Alden, Mary Dunn, Eugene, Alfred and Edward).  In addition to his wife and children, he was survived by fifteen grandchildren and sixteen great-grandchildren.[1]

Transcripts

New York, New York, Death Index

Isaiah Golden

Age: 87

Birth Year: about 1824

Death Date: 21 July 1911

Death Place: Kings, New York

Certificate Number: 14473

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Brooklyn, New York, 24 July 1911, Page 3, “Obituary”

Isaiah Golden

Isaiah Golden, a retired cooper, for many years in business on old Ewen street, and a resident of the Eastern District for sixty years, died on Friday at his residence, 79 Somers street, of a complication of diseases.  He was born at West Farms, Westchester County, N.Y., March 4, 1824, and was one of the oldest members of the Old Bushwick Dutch Reformed Church on Humboldt street.  He is survived by a widow, Susanna Grow; three daughters, Mrs. George Alden, Mrs. Cornelius Travis, and Mrs. Peter l. Dunn; three sons, Eugene, Alfred and Edward; fifteen grandchildren and sixteen great-grandchildren.

[1] “Isaiah Golden,” Index to New York City Deaths 1862-1948, New York: New York City Department of Records/Municipal Archives, New York, New York, Death Index, 1862-1948 [database online], Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014.

“Obituary: Isaiah Golden,” The Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Brooklyn, NY, Page 3, July 24, 1911, Newspapers.com, 2017.

Isaiah Golden – Old Bushwick Dutch Reformed Church Membership

Isaiah and Susanah Golden were members of the Old Bushwick Reformed Church, a congregation of the Dutch Reformed Church.  They were received into the congregation on April 10, 1898 by method of confession.  According to the church record, they eventually left the church, but the date and circumstances of their departure was not noted.[1]

Isaiah Golden - Old Bushwick Reformed Church

Old Bushwick Dutch Reformed Church

The Church was located on the corner of Conselyea and Humboldt Streets in Brooklyn, with Old Woodpoint Road and Skillman Avenue bounding the church on the other sides of the building.  This was just two blocks from the family home and business. Originally founded in 1654 in the Dutch settlement of Bushwick (“Boswyck”), the church was remodeled and added on to in both 1711 and 1829.  The church was disbanded in 1919, with the building demolished. [2]  The land was eventually sold the Roman Catholic Church, and S. Francis of Paola Roman Catholic Church now stands on the site.  The records from the church were lost in part, when a city janitor used the papers to start fires in the furnace at Brooklyn City Hall.[3]

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Wed__Apr_29__1936_New_York_Tribune_Sun__Jan_31__1904_

As early as 1909, citizens of Brooklyn were trying to save the church, stating “…we should remember that this church building is the only connecting link in the Eastern District between the dim past and the present.  Other cities carefully guard old landmarks, and try to preserve them for the benefit of later generations.  Why not spare this venerable structure and extend Bushwick Avenue through Woodpoint Road in a trifling curve around the church?”[4]  The church has been struggling in the years before it disbanded because the neighborhood had changed significantly, as mainly Italian Catholics had moved into the area.[5]

The first church built on the property was octagonal in shape with a high roof, characterized as “resembling a haystack”.  When initially built, it was an open enclosure, without pews for the congregation, who would bring their own seats to church.  In 1795, pews and a gallery were added.  Eventually the original church was replaced with a more modern building in 1829, and then further remodeled in 1876.  In 1878, a school building was added to the property.  At first the church has a squatter’s claim to the property, until a bill passed in Albany in 1800 gave them ten acres in the village of Bushwick.  The school building was the first to be sold off to the Polish Catholic Church.[6]

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Apr_21__1918_

Transcript

Old Bushwick Reformed Church: 1 July 1909, Page 56

GOLDEN, ISAIAH, Received 10 April 1898 by Confession, Remarks Left

GOLDEN, SUSANAH S., Wife, Received 10 April 1898 by Confession, Remarks Left

 

[1] The Archives of the Reformed Church in America; New Brunswick, New Jersey, Bushwick Church, Church Register, 1789-1914, US Selected States Dutch Reformed Church Membership Records, 1701-1995, Provo, UT, Ancestry.com Operations Inc., 2016.

[2] “Bushwick Dutch Reformed Church Records, 1713-1817,” http://brooklynhistory.org/library/wp/bushwick-dutch-reformed-church-records-1713-1817/.

“Brooklyn Reformed Dutch Church Records,” http://bklyn-genealogy-info.stevemorse.org/Worship/BklynReformedDutchRecords.html.

“Old Bushwick Dutch Reformed Church Remembered,” http://www.whowalkinbrooklyn.com/?p=1139.

[3] “Dutch Records of Old Bushwick Used to Light Fires in Brooklyn City Hall,” Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 21 April 1918, Page 9, Newspapers.com.

Google Map view of Conselya & Humbolt, Brooklyn, https://www.google.com/maps/@40.7154099,-73.9426813,3a,90y,1.24h,88.25t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sdChenISveKNuGko8yOgXQA!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

[4] Letter from Eugene Armbruster to the Editor of the Brooklyn Times, September 11, 1909, reprinted in “Old Bushwick Dutch Reformed Church Remembered,” http://www.whowalkinbrooklyn.com/?p=1139

[5] “Old Bushwick Church: Dutch Reformed Society There Will Soon Be 250 Years Old,” New York Tribune, 31 January 1904, Page 10, Newspapers.com.

[6] “Dutch Records of Old Bushwick Used to Light Fires in Brooklyn City Hall,” Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 21 April 1918, Page 9, Newspapers.com.

“Old Bushwick Church: Dutch Reformed Society There Will Soon Be 250 Years Old,” New York Tribune, 31 January 1904, Page 10, Newspapers.com.

Isaiah Golden Civil War Draft Registration

In June 1863, Isaiah Golden registered for the US Civil War draft.  He is listed as 42 years old, worked as a cooper, and as having been born in New York.  The record indicates that he had no previous military service experience.

Isaiah James Golden - U.S., Civil War Draft Registrations Records, 1863-1865 - edited

Transcript

Third Congressional District: New York, Kings, Brooklyn, June 1863, 8 S. 6th Street:

GOLDEN, ISAIAH, Age 42, White, Occupation: Cooper, Born New York, No Former Military Service, No remarks.

Isaiah Golden – US Tax Assessments

 

State
Date
Name
Location/ Post Office
Occupation
Class
No. in Abstract
Licenses
Total Amount of Tax Due
New York
May 1864
Golden, Isaiah & Bro.
2nd b/n N.  3rd and N. 4th
Manufacturers
B
42
$10
$10
New York
May 1864
Isaiah Golden
25 S. Third
New York
May 1864
Valentine Golden
212 Second Street
State
Date
Name
Location/ Post Office
Occupation
No. in Abstract
 
Quantity or Valuation
Rate of Tax
Amount of Tax Upon Particular Article
Total
Date of Payment
New York
March 1865
Golden, Isaiah
209 Second
Kegs
44
 
$540
5%
$27
$27
New York
May 1865
Golden, Isaiah
209 Second
Kegs, Buckets, etc.
44
 
$198
6%
$11.88
$11.88
New York
May 1865
Golden, Isaiah
209 Second
Manufacturer
 
$10
$10
New York
October 1865
Golden, Isaiah
209 Second
Buckets, Tubs, etc.
44
 
621
6%
$37.26
$37.26
New York
November 1865
Golden, Isaiah
209 Second
Casks
44
 
767
6%
$46.02
$46.02
New York
December 1865
Golden, Isaiah
209 Second
Kegs, etc.
116
 
888
6%
$53.21
$53.21
New York
January 1866
Golden, Isaiah
209 Second
Kegs
44
 
685
6%
$41.10
$41.10
New York
February 1866
Golden, Isaiah
209 Second
Shot Kegs
44
 
501
6%
$30.06
$30.06
New York
March 1866
Golden, Isaiah
209 Second
Buckets Kegs
44
 
670
6%
$40.26
$40.26
New York
April 1866
Golden, Isaiah
209 Second
Buckets and Pails
44
 
459
6%
$27.54
$27.54
New York
May 1866
Golden, Isaiah
209 Second
Manufacturer
219
 
$10
$10
$10
New York
May 1866
Golden, Isaiah
209 Second
Buckets Kegs
44
 
360
6%
$21.60
$21.60
New York
June 1866
Golden, Isaiah
209 Second
Kegs & Buckets
44
 
373
6%
$22.38
$22.38
New York
August 1866
Golden Isaiah
209 Second
Shot Kegs
44
 
304
6%
$18.24
$18.24

From 1864 to 1866 a number of IRS Tax Assessments can be fund for Isaiah Golden and his business.  The majority of the assessments list his location as 209 Second Street.  He is variably listed as the manufacturer of Kegs, Buckets, Tubs, Shot Kegs and Pails.  The valuation of his taxable income varies from $198 and $888.  The tax rate was most frequently a percentage but on a couple of assessments he was taxed a flat $10.  For the percentage based assessments, he was taxed between $11.88 and $53.21.[1]

[1] Records of the Internal Revenue Service, Group 58, The National Archives at Washington, DC, US IRS Tax Assessment Lists, 1862-1918, Provo, UT, Ancestry.com Operations Inc., 2008.