Noteboom

52 Ancestors – #8: Jannetje Zweersen

Jannetje Zweersen was born on 8 February 1713 in Zwolle, Overijssel, Netherlands.  She married Sjouke Sijes Noteboom in Amsterdam, where they lived for awhile. They were both members of the Dutch Reformed Church.  Jannetje gave birth to thirteen children.  Her oldest, Jan, was born in 1734 and lived for 78 years.  Sije, the second son, was born in 1735 and lived 64 years.  Jacob, was born in 1737 and died as a young child at the age of 6.  Fennigje, her first daughter, was born in 1739 and died in 1744 at the age of 5.  Atje was born in 1741 and died eight years later.  The second Jacob was born in 1742 and died in 1746.  Fennigien was born in 1744 and her fate is unknown.  Jakobus was born in 1746 and lived for 77 years.  Sijke was born in 1748 and her fate is unknown.  Attie was born in 1749 and her fate is unknown.  Sjouke was born in 1752 and died as an infant.  The second Sjouke was born in 1753 and lived to be 41 years old.  Harmanus was born in 1754 and died in 1808 at the age of 54.  Jannetje died in 1799 at the age of 86 years old.  She outlived at least 7 of her children.

 

Coat of arms of the Dutch municipality of Zwolle

Coat of arms of the Dutch municipality of Zwolle (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

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52 Ancestors – #7: Sjouke Sijes Noteboom

Sjouke Sijes Noteboom was born sometime before 1707 in Oenkerk, Friesland, Netherlands.  He was baptized in the Dutch Reformed Church in Oenkerk on 2 October 1707.  He was a master builder and carpenter. Sjouke married Jannetje Zweersen on 1 May 1733 in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Sjouke was responsible for constructing the new city council chamber behind the townhall in Leeuwarden.  He died in 1760 before construction could be completed.  He was buried on 13 December 1760 in Oenkerk.

Leeuwarden City Hall

Leeuwarden City Hall
Wutsje / Wikimedia Commons, via Wikimedia Commons

52 Ancestors – #4: Sijke Andries

Sijke Andries is my 8th great-grandmother on my father’s mother’s side of the family.  She was born on September 26, 1680 in Oenkerk, Friesland, the Netherlands.  She married Sije Sjoukes Noteboom on October 9, 1702 and was a member of the Dutch Reformed Church.  She is know to have one son Sjouke Sijes Noteboom.  She died in approximately 1728 in Oenkerk.1

oenkerk

Oenkerk, Friesland, Netherlands, Map Data ©2016 Google


  1.  “Sijke Andries,” Stamboom Dusseljee, (Coret Genealogie 1997-2016), https://www.genealogieonline.nl/en/stamboom-dusseljee/I385.php, Accessed: 2 January 2016. 

52 Ancestors – #3: Sije Sjoukes Noteboom

Sije Sjoukes Noteboom is my 8th great-grandfather on my father’s mother’s side of the family.  Sije Sjoukes Noteboom was born in approximately 1680 in the Netherlands.  As an adult he was a member of the Dutch Reformed Church.  His occupation was that of a master carpenter.  Sije married Sijke Andries on October 9, 1702.  Both took confession in the Dutch Reform Church in 1707 in Oenkerk, Friesland, Netherlands.  They had one child they named Sjouke Sijes Noteboom.  Sije died in about 1728 in Oenkerk.[^1]

800px-Kerkje_Oenkerk

Kerkje Oenkerk,
By http://picasaweb.google.com/molenaarserf/ [CC BY 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

[^1] “Sije Sjoukes Noteboom”, Stamboom Dusseljee, (Coret Genealogie 1997-2016), https://www.genealogieonline.nl/en/stamboom-dusseljee/I386.php, Accessed: 2 January 2016.

Ancestral Homeland – Winschoten, Groningen, Netherlands

The Noteboom family moved to Winschoten, Groningen, Netherlands from Emden, Lower Saxony, Germany in 1843.1

Winschoten is located in the northeast of the Netherlands, near the River Eems and the border with Germany.

Winschoten, Netherlands

Winschoten, Netherlands, Map Data ©2016 Google

It became a city in 1825, being granted its city rights.  The town was once populated with 13 mills, earning it the nickname “Molenstad” or “Milltown”.  Three of those mills still remain today:

  • Molen Berg, built in 1854.  Originally designed to grind corn.
  • Dijkstra Molen, built in 1862.
  • Molen Edens, built in 1763.  It is the oldest mill in Groningen.

Molen Edens

Molens Edens. Michel Dellebeke [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

The Dutch Reformed church, which is the one my family most likely attended, is located on the Marketplein.

Dutch Reform Church, Marktplein

Dutch Reform Church, Marktplein, Rijksdienst voor het Cultureel Erfgoed [CC BY-SA 3.0 nl (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/nl/deed.en)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Residents of Winschoten have a funny nickname – they are often called “tellerlikker”, which means one who licks their plate clean.  They have a reputation for eating their meals with great gusto.2

Tellerlikkers

Tellerlikkers, By Gerardus (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

 


  1.  Lamoraal Noteboom, “Genealogy of Sije Sjoukes,” p. 4; report to Larisa Thomas, [STREET ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Novato, California, 18 Dec 1908, rev. 1996-1998; photocopy held by Peggy McKnight Weymer, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE]. Rec. Date: 20 Sep 2015.  Cit. Date: 20 Sep 2015; Revised by Wouter Antoon Noteboom, Antoon Noteboom and Johanna Lodewijks-Dusseljee. 
  2. “Winschoten,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopediahttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winschoten, Accessed: 5 Jan 2016.