How to… Get Organized with Researching My Family Tree

I’ve been away for a little while – been incredibly busy with a major work project, which included a lot of hours and travel.  Left me too exhausted and with too little time to spend on researching my family tree.  However, in May, I came across a blog post that inspired me to spend some time organizing.  Michele Simmons Lewis on her blog Ancestoring describes an Excel trick for working with the data in her Ancestry.com family tree.  At the end, it produces a spreadsheet with a list of all your ancestors, along with their birth and death dates/places.  Part of the beauty of the list is the list of names will contain a hyperlink to the individual profiles on Ancestry.com.  Here’s an example of what my list looks like:

 

My Family List in Excel

My Family List in Excel

 

Then I took the spreadsheet a few steps further – in part because I’m a complete Excel geek and because I like to use data to solve problems.  My next step, I added some extra columns:

Columns in My Spreadsheet

Columns in My Spreadsheet

 

  • Relationship (to me)
  • Side of the Family (Maternal, Paternal and N/A).  N/A is for my siblings, their spouses, children, etc. who don’t belong to actually one side of the family or the other.
  • Copies of Citations/Docs Downloaded.  (I’ll get more into this below.)
  • File location (for the MRIN/Marriage Record Identification Number, which I use for organizing my computer file folders)

In addition to the columns, I do a couple of other things to the data to make it easier to work with:

  1. Create a table for the range of data.  Excel behaves differently when working with data within a table that makes it easier to work with, especially when the data is very similar and when working with formulas.  To do this, highlight all the rows and columns of data in the spreadsheet.   On the Home tab, select Format as Table, then select the table format that you want/like.  I prefer a table that has alternating colors for the lines because I find that easier to read.
Formatting a Table

Formatting a Table

  1. Then I add a Filter to the column headers.  Highlight the row of headers, and select Filter on the Data tab.  Once the filter is set, you can click on any of the down arrows next to a column header to:
  • Sort by that column
  • Filter by certain data, such as a surname, and hide all the other rows of data.
Filters in Excel

Filters in Excel

Once I had the data formatted the way I wanted it, I was ready to get to work.  Using the hyperlinked name for each member of my family tree, I noted their relationship to me (concentrating only on direct ancestors and their siblings – I bypassed any cousins x times removed) and what side of the family they fell on.  This is easy in the Ancestry.com individual profile, as the relationship is noted in the header information.

Ancestry Profile Header

Ancestry Profile Header

But the main purpose of this list is to keep track of downloading copies of the records attached to my ancestors’ profiles to my computer to retain my own digital copy of all their records.  I’m still working my way through this, but I’ve got a good head start.  Once I’ve download the attached records of a particular profile, I mark the row as “Complete” under the column: Copies of Citations/Docs Downloaded.  I also save a .pdf of the citation page from Ancestry.com for each record, including any index citations, in the ancestor profile.  I then put the path for the file folder on my computer in the last column so that I know where to find these files later.

Download and File Location Columns

Download and File Location Columns

The next trick I use in Excel is Conditional Formatting.  Whenever I enter the word “Complete” in the Download column, it will highlight the row in green so I can easily see which ancestors I’ve completed downloading the documents for.  If the ancestor doesn’t have any source citations in their profile, I mark the column as “None”.  Any marked with “None” get highlighted in red.

Conditional Formatting

Conditional Formatting

To use Conditional Formatting to highlight a whole row, based on the contents of a single cell:

  • Highlight the row of data.
  • Select Conditional Formatting from the Home tab.
  • Select New Rule
  • In the New Formatting Rule dialog box, select “Use a formula to determine which cells to format”.
  • Enter the formula entering an equal sign, click on the cell that will contain the data you want to base the formatting on.  In this case, I select the cell F59 for the Download column for row 59.  This is where I will note “Complete” or “None”.  Enter another equal sign, then the text (in quotes) that you will base the formatting on, in this case, “Complete”.
  • Click on the Format… button to select the formatting you want applied to the row, such as fill, font color and border.
  • Click OK.
  • Repeat the process for “None”.
  • Click OK to exit out of the Conditional Formatting dialog box.
Conditional Formatting Rules

Conditional Formatting Rules

  • Select the Format Painter tool and copy the formatting to all rows in the spreadsheet.
Format Painter Tool

Format Painter Tool

Now that the spreadsheet is formatted the way I wanted, I worked my way through my family tree, surname by surname, noting the relationship and side of the family.

Now I can easily produce to do lists for research and downloading records for parts of my family tree by filtering the list based on surname, relationship type, side of the family, etc., depending on what part of my family tree I want to concentrate on.

And in the habit of playing with data, I also created some fun tables of summary information at the bottom of my spreadsheet, using some easy Countif formulas:

Counts by Side of the Family:

Count by Side of the Family

Count by Side of the Family

For example, to count the Maternal line, the formula is =countif(Range of Data, Cell with the word Maternal in it).  The formula will count all cells that contain the matching word from the data table.

Count by Side of Family Results

Count by Side of Family Results

 

Count by Complete Downloads

Count by Complete Download

Count by Complete Download

For example, to count the Complete Download, the formula is =countif(Range of Data, “Complete”).  The formula will count all cells that contain the word “Complete” from the data table.  Then count the total number of rows by with the CountA formula, written as: =counta(range of data).  In the last column, divide the Total Complete by the Total Count to get the percentage completed.

Count by Complete Downloads Results

Count by Complete Downloads Results

 

Count by Relationship Type

Count by Relationship Type

Count by Relationship Type

For example, to count the number of 2nd Great Uncles, the formula is =countif(Range of Data, Cell with the phrase “2nd Great Uncle” in it).  The formula will count all cells that contain the matching phrase from the data table.

Count by Relationship Type Results

Count by Relationship Type Results

A note about the “$” in some of the formulas: this hard codes the cell referenced in the formula, so that if you drag the formula down to copy it to additional cells, that part of the formula remains constant and only the non-$ numbers adjust.

So many thanks to Michele Simmons Lewis for the inspiration to riff off in order to get organized with my research.

Marriage Certificates of Walter Noteboom

I just the received the marriage certificates for Walter Noteboom and his first and third wives.

The Marriage Certificate of Walter Noteboom and Beta Friederike Christiane Nullmeyer

Certificate of Marriage.

State of New York

Certificate 2042

I hereby Certify, that Wolter Noteboom [and] Beta Friederika Christiane Nullmeyer; were joined in Marriage by me, in accordance with the Laws of the State of New York, in the City of [blank] this 11th day of November 1876.

Witnesses to the Marriage,

A. Giese

[illegible] Lermann

Attest Fr. W.T. Steimle

Official Station Pastor of the German Ev. Cath. Zion Church [Zion German Evangelical Lutheran Church]

Residence 391 Jay Street

  1. Full Name of Groom, Wolter Noteboom
  2. Place of Residence, New York
  3. Age, 32 years
  4. No
  5. Occupation, Shipping Clerk
  6. Place of Birth, Winschoten, Netherlands
  7. Father’s Name, Wolter Noteboom
  8. Mother’s maiden Name, Hinderina de Weerdt
  9. of Groom’s Marriage, 1
  10. Full Name of Bride, Beta Friedericke Christiane Nullmeyer

Maiden Name, if a Widow, ——–

  1. Place of Residence, Brooklyn
  2. Age, 26
  3. No
  4. Place of Birth, Bremen, Germany
  5. Father’s Name, Albert Nullmeyer
  6. Mother’s Maiden Name, Meta Dorothea Koch
  7. of Bride’s Marriage, 1

N.B. – At Nos. 4 and 13 state if Colored; if other races, specify what.  At Nos. 9 and 17 state whether 1st, 2d, 3d, &c., Marriage of each.

Brooklyn, 11 November 1876

We, the Groom and Bride named in the above Certificate, hereby Certify that the information given is correct, to the best of our knowledge and belief.

Wolter Noteboom, Groom

Beta Nullmeyer, Bride

Signed in the presence of A. Giese

And Charles Lermann

Canarsia L T

47 - Walter Noteboom marriage certificate to Beta Nullmeyer - 1

47 – Walter Noteboom marriage certificate to Beta Nullmeyer – 1

47 - Walter Noteboom  marriage certificate to Beta Nullmeyer - 2

47 – Walter Noteboom marriage certificate to Beta Nullmeyer – 2

The Marriage Certificate of Walter Noteboom and Kate Dulk

City of New York

State of New York

Certificate Number 3938

I hereby certify, that, Walter Noteboom and Katie A. Dülk were joined in Marriage by me in accordance with the laws of the State of New York, in the Borough of Brooklyn, City of New York, this 25 day of June 1901.

Witnesses to the Marriage

Michael Dülk

Anna H.E. Noteboom

Signature of the Person performing the Ceremony

F.S. Moore

 

Date of Marriage June 25th, 1901
Groom’s First Name Wolter Noteboom
Residence 64 Van Siclen Ave.
Age 56
Color White
Single or Widowed Widowed
Birthplace Holland
Father’s Name Wolter Noteboom
Mother’s Maiden Name Henderina De Weerdt
Number of Groom’s Marriage Third
Bride’s Full Name Katie A. Dülk
Residence 168 Schenck Ave.
Age 39
Color White
Single or Widowed Single
Maiden Name if a Widow ———–
Birthplace New York City
Father’s Name Peter Dülk
Mother’s Maiden Name Anna Brill
Number of Bride’s Marriage First
Name of Person performing ceremony F.S. Moore
Official Station Rector [illegible]
Residence 122 [illegible] Ave.

 

We, the Groom and Bride named in this Certificate, hereby certify, that the information given therein is correct, to the best of our knowledge and belief.

Walter Noteboom, Groom

Katie A. Dülk, Bride

Signed in the presence of Michael Dülk

And Anna H.E. Noteboom

47 - Walter Noteboom marriage certificate to Kate Dulk - 1

47 – Walter Noteboom marriage certificate to Kate Dulk – 1

47 - Walter Noteboom marriage certificate to Kate Dulk - 2

47 – Walter Noteboom marriage certificate to Kate Dulk – 2

Zion German Evangelical Lutheran Church

Zion German Evangelical Lutheran Church, Brooklyn Heights

Zion German Evangelical Lutheran Church, Brooklyn Heights
By Beyond My Ken (Own work) [GFDL or CC BY-SA 4.0-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0], via Wikimedia Commons

The Zion German Evangelical Lutheran Church was founded in 1856 and still operates today at 125 Henry Street in Brooklyn Heights, New York.  My 3rd great-grandparents Walter Noteboom and Beta Frederike Christiane Nullmeyer were married there on 11 November 1876.  They were married by the founding pastor, Friedrich W.T. Steimle.

The first church service was held on the first Sunday in Advent in 1855 (December 2nd), with twelve worshipers in attendance.  The service was held in a hall at Nassau and Fulton Streets.  The congregation was comprised of recent German immigrants, who wished to maintain their traditions as Lutheran Christians.  The services were conducted in German.  In the early days, the church was very small, with no more than four worshippers in atttendance.  However, the congregation grew quickly, welcoming the many recent Germans who immigrated to the New York area and necessitating the move to a new home at 189 Washington Street in May 1856. Before the end of the year, the church was incorporated and purchased its permanent home at 125 Henry Street for $14,500.  The Henry Street church was originally built as a Dutch Reform church in 1839, making it the oldest church in Brooklyn Heights that is still being used.1

Pastor Friedrich Wilhelm Tobias Steimle was born in 1827 in Wurttemberg, Germany, and earned his missionary education in Basel.  He arrived in New York in January 1851, and served as an assistant pastor to Dr. Stohlmann until 1855, when he began the Zion German Evangelical Lutheran Church.  He was licensed by the Ministry of New York, and helped found the German New York Synod for which he served as President for six years.  He passed away on 28 February 1880 at almost 53 years of age.2


  1. Church Marriages“, The German Genealogy Group, http://www.germangenealogygroup.com, Accessed: 2 Feb 2015.
    Nicum, John. Geschichte des Evangelisch – Lutherischen Ministeriums vom Staate New York und Angrenzenden Staaten und Ländern (History of the Evangelical – Lutheran Ministry of the State of New York and Adjacent States and countries), New York: Lutheran Church, New York Ministry, 1888, page 351, digital images, Google Books (https://books.google.com/books?id=eo0sAAAAYAAJ&source=gbs_navlinks_s, Accessed: 2 February 2015). 
  2. Nicum, 375. 

52 Ancestors # 4: Gerald Francis Thomas

Gerald Thomas and Anna Noteboom

Gerald Thomas and Anna Noteboom From the collection of Lawrence John Reilly Sr.

172 Miller Avenue, Brooklyn Image capture: Oct 2014, © Google

172 Miller Avenue, Brooklyn
Image capture: Oct 2014, © Google

Gerald Francis Thomas was born on March 10, 1902 in Queens, New York to Anna Henrietta Noteboom and Francis Theodore Thomas.1  By the age of 3, the family was living at 172 Miller Avenue in Brooklyn, along with three other families.  His father was working as a shirt ironer, and his mother was at home with him and his baby sister Mae, who had been born two years earlier.2  By 1910, his dad had left the family and his mother was raising him and his two siblings on her own.  (Baby brother Frank had been born in 1908. The family had moved to 465 Belmont Avenue in Brooklyn, which was a duplex shared with one other family.3

Anna Noteboom Thomas, with her children, Gerald, Mae and Frank Thomas. Year unknown. From the collection of cousin Paul.

Anna Noteboom Thomas, with Gerald, Mae and Frank Thomas. circa 1915. courtesy of cousin Paul.

Frank, Mae and Gerald Thomas circa 1915 courtesy of cousin Paul

Frank, Mae and Gerald Thomas
circa 1915
courtesy of cousin Paul

Mae, Gerald, Frank and Anna Thomas circa 1909 courtesy of cousin Paul

Mae, Gerald, Frank and Anna Thomas
circa 1909
courtesy of cousin Paul

 

 

 

As a young teenager, Gerald was helping his mother make ends meet with a series of odd jobs around the neighborhood.4  The family was now living at 2762 Atlantic Avenue, and had taken on a boarder named Alice Cokely.  Gerald, Mae and Frank, ranging in ages from 13 down to 7, were all in school.5  In 1918, Gerald registered for the draft for World War I, stating his birth date at 10 March 1900.  He was working as a chauffeur for V. Henning & Sons on Belmont Avenue in Brooklyn.  He is described on the draft card as medium height and medium build, with brown eyes and black hair.6 By 1920, Gerald was 18 years old, and was no longer attending school.  He still lived at home with his mother and two siblings at their home on Atlantic Avenue.7

147 Schenck Avenue, Brooklyn Image capture: Oct 2014 ©2015 Google

147 Schenck Avenue, Brooklyn
Image capture: Oct 2014 ©2015 Google


In March 1923, Gerald married the love of his live, Louise Schillinger.  They were married at Louise’s parents’ house at 169 Van Siclen Avenue in Brooklyn.  Their brothers got in an argument at the reception, and her brother Louie chased Frank from the house, catching his foot on the fence, breaking his leg, and bringing the reception to an abrupt end.8  In 1925, the young family found themselves living at 147 Schenck Avenue with their baby daughter, Ethel.  Two other families lived in the house, including Gerald’s Aunt Honey and her family (the Weymers).  Gerald was working as a letter carrier. 9  Five years later, they were still at the Schenck house, along with another daughter, Marion (my grandmother), and Gerald’s mother, Anna Thomas.10

By 1940, Gerald and Louise had moved their family to Queens, renting one half of a duplex that they shared with the Almon family at 110-21 107th Street.  Gerald was a printer, working for an insurance company and earning $2200 a year.  The rent for the home was $35 per month.11

Gerald and Louise were married for 55 years.  Louise passed away on July 9, 1978.  Gerald passed away just under a year later on June 24, 1979.12

 


  1. Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database online].  Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2006.  Original data: National Archives and Records Administration, Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910, Serial T624, Roll 977, Brooklyn Ward 26, Kings, New York, Page 3B, Enumeration District 0783, FHL microfilm 1374990.
    Ancestry.com. 1920 United States Federal Census [database online].  Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.  Original data: National Archives and Records Administration, Fourteenth Census of the United States, 1920, Serial T625, Roll 1179, Brooklyn Assembly District 22, Kings, New York, Page 9A, Enumeration District 1409, Image 968.
    Ancestry.com. 1930 United States Federal Census [database online].  Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2002.  Original data: National Archives and Records Administration, Fifteenth Census of the United States, 1930, Serial T626, Roll 1540, Brooklyn, Kings, New York, Page 13A, Enumeration District 0483, Image 563, FHL microfilm 2341275.
    Ancestry.com. 1940 United States Federal Census [database online].  Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.  Original data: National Archives and Records Administration, Sixteenth Census of the United States, 1940, Serial T627, Roll 2747, New York, Queens, New York, Page 3A, Enumeration District 41-1401.
    Ancestry.com.  Florida Death Index, 1877-1998 [database online].  Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2004.  Original data: State of Florida. Florida Death Index, 1877-1998.  Florida: Florida Department of Health, Office of Vital Records, 1998.
    Ancestry.com.  New York City, Births, 1891-1902 [database online].  Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2000.  Original data: New York Department of Health.  Births reported in the city of New York, 1891-1902.  New York, NY, USA: Department of Health, Certificate Number: 563.
    Ancestry.com.  New York, State Census, 1905 [database online].  Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014.  Original data: New York State Archives, State Population Census Schedules, 1905, Election District 19, Assembly District 22, City Brooklyn, County Kings. New York State Archives, Albany, New York.
    Ancestry.com.  New York, State Census, 1915 [database online].  Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.  Original data: New York State Archives, State Population Census Schedules, 1915, Election District 44, Assembly District 22, City New York, County Kings, Page 43. New York State Archives, Albany, New York.
    Ancestry.com.  New York, State Census, 1925 [database online].  Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.  Original data: New York State Archives, State Population Census Schedules, 1925, Election District 24, Assembly District 22, City Brooklyn, County Kings, Page 9. New York State Archives, Albany, New York.
    Ancestry.com. U.S. Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014 [database online]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011. Original data: Social Security Administration. Social Security Death Index, Master File, Number 058-01-8448, Issue State New York, Issue Date before 1951. 
  2.  1905 New York State Census
  3.  1910 U.S. Federal Census. 
  4.  Letter from Gerald Thomas to his daughters, April 1979. Photocopy in collection of author. Original location unknown. 
  5.  1915 New York State Census. 
  6. FamilySearch.org.  United States World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918, index and images (accessed 6 February 2015), Gerald Francis Thomas, 1917-1918; citing New York City no 79, New York, United States, NARA microfilm publication M1509 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 1,754,612. 
  7. 1920 U.S. Federal Census. 
  8. Letter from Gerald Thomas. 
  9.  1925 New York State Census. 
  10.  1930 U.S. Federal Census. 
  11.  1940 U.S. Federal Census. 
  12. Letter from Gerald Thomas.
    Florida Death Index.
    Social Security Index.
    Ancestry.com. U.S. Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014 [database online]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011. Original data: Social Security Administration. Social Security Death Index, Master File, Number 098-14-2345, Issue State New York, Issue Date before 1951. 

Death Certificates for Walter and Christiane Noteboom

I got two death certificates in the mail yesterday – one for Walter Noteboom and one for Christiane Noteboom.

Walter Noteboom Death Certification, NYC Municipal Archives Image ©Larisa Thomas, Roots of Kinship

Walter Noteboom Death Certification, NYC Municipal Archives
Image ©Larisa Thomas, Roots of Kinship

Transcript of Walter’s Death Certificate:

Date: 14 Dec 1913
Surname: Noteboom Given Name: Walter Sex: M
Street: Schenck Avenue Street #: 247 City: Brooklyn County: Kings
State/Province: New York Country: United States
Place of Death: Lutheran Hospital
Marital Status: Married Color/Race: White Age: 70 Occupation: Retired
Birth Place: Netherlands Birth Date: 12 November 1844 Spouse: K. Noteboom
Father: Wolter Noteboom Birth Place: Netherlands
Mother: Henderina de Wirdt Birth Place: Netherlands
Informant: not listed
Cause(s) of Death: Exhaustion following operation for removal of prostate gland
Contributary Cause(s): Chronic hypertrophic prostatitis , chronic cystitis
Duration of Illness: 3 ds.
Physician: W. Haybolt Address: 114 Pennsylvania Avenue
Burial Date: 17 December 1913 Burial Place: Evergreens Cemetery
Undertaker: [illegible] Moore Address: 64 [illegible] Ave
Remarks: I hereby certify that this foregoing particulars (Nos. 1 to 14 inclusive) are correct as near as the same can be ascertained, and I further certify that I attended the deceased from Jan 1 1912 to Dec 14, 1913, that I last saw him alive on the 13 day of Dec 1913, that death occurred on that date stated above at 9am, and that the cause of death was as follows:
[see cause of death]
duration 0 yrs. 0 mos. 3 ds.
duration of contributory cause of death 15 yrs. 0 mos. 0 ds.

 

Comments on Walter’s Death Certificate

  1. Walter died at Lutheran Hospital following prostate surgery, for a condition he suffered from for 15 years, according to the Doctor’s certification.  Lutheran Hospital is now Lutheran Medical Center and is still a fully functional teaching hospital.
  2. I wonder if his dying at Lutheran Hospital is a possible indicator of his faith, or if that is just coincidence.
  3. His mother’s maiden name is spelled differently than in other records I have for her, but that may be an error of the unknown informant.
  4. I have another address for him that I didn’t previously have – 247 Schenck Avenue.  It’s still located in the general vicinity of his other properties in East New York.
  5. He is buried at Evergreens Cemetery.   FindaGrave.com and BillionGraves both had no record of his burial.  I created a memorial for him on FindaGrave.com.

 

Christiane Noteboom Death Certification, NYC Municipal Archives Image ©Larisa Thomas, Roots of Kinship

Christiane Noteboom Death Certification, NYC Municipal Archives
Image ©Larisa Thomas, Roots of Kinship


Transcript of Christiane’s Death Certificate:

Date: 9 Oct 1900
Surname: Noteboom  Given Name: Christiane  Sex: F
Street: Van Siclen Avenue Street#: 64  City: Brooklyn  County: Kings 
State/Province: New York  Country: United States
Place of Death: 64 Van Siclen Avenue
Marital Status: Married  Color/Race: White  Age: 48 years, 3 months, 12 days  Occupation:  Housewife
Birth Place: Germany  Years in the U.S.: 25 years  Years in City of New York: 21 years
Father: August Nullmeyer Birth Place: Germany
Mother: Dora Nullmeyer Birth Place: Germany 
Informant: not listed
Cause(s) of Death: Cerebral Apoplexy
Physician: W.P. Hickok Address: 114 Pennsylvania Avenue
Burial Date: 10 October 1900  Burial Place: Evergreen
Undertaker: Louis Bacler  Address: 477 Liberty Avenue
Remarks: I hereby certify that I attended the deceased from Oct. 7, 1900 to Oct. 9, 1900 that I last saw her alive on the 9th day of Oct. 1900, that she died on the 9th day of Oct. 1900, about 4:15 o’clock P.M., and that to the best of my knowledge and belief, the cause of her death was as hereunder written. [see cause of death]

 

Comments on Christiane’s Death Certificate

  1. Details of her age match other records I have that list her date of birth as 27 June 1852.
  2. The birth index I found lists her father as Albert Nullmeyer, while this record names him August Nullmeyer.  Given the time and distance, and without knowing who the informant on the death certificate is, I would argue that Albert is probably the correct given name for her father.  But this is an area I will have to research further.
  3. I had thought she might have died in childbirth, but this clearly is a stroke.  That means, it is probably his first wife, Beta, who died in childbirth.  I have found little to no records of Beta’s actual existence, so this will be another area of research.
  4. She is buried in Evergreens Cemetery in Brooklyn.  FindaGrave.com and BillionGraves both had no record of her burial.  I created a memorial for her on FindAGrave.com and linked it to Walter’s memorial.  I would like to get a photo of both of their gravesites.
  5. The number of years she’s was in the United States differs from the number of years that she was in New York City.  This means that she likely entered the United States either through Canada or in a different port of entry, such as Baltimore or Philadelphia.  This gives me another clue for finding her immigration records, as I had previously been unable to find her on New York Passenger Lists.